LOL! Late to the party much? Many of us already knew this. That’s how we ended up on the NYT bestseller list…

David Gaughran

new-mailchimp-logoWhat happens when a reader finishes your e-books? What’s the first thing they see? What’s the first thing they do? Back-matter is extremely important. Presuming you have done your job as a writer well, it’s a golden opportunity to draw readers into your world.

The basic components of effective back-matter are fairly straightforward: blurbs for and/or links to your other books, links to whatever social media presence you have, a short note requesting reviews, and, most important of all, a link to your New Release Mailing List.

If you don’t have a mailing list already, you need to set one up immediately. It’s one of the most powerful tools at your disposal. Without an effective method for collecting readers’ emails (which I’ll get to), every time you have a sales spike, every time you go on a free run, you are missing out on a huge opportunity to…

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I love this blog post.

J.M. Dattilo

The agony and the ecstasy. That’s the best way to describe what it is like for authors to read reviews of their books. It’s natural to want to know what readers think of your story, but, overall, it is better to give it a miss. Why? Reviews will eventually affect your writing.

But isn’t that the point, some folks will ask. Don’t reviews help authors improve, point out flaws, show them the strengths and weaknesses of the story? Not necessarily. Reviews reflect the personal experience of the reader and every reader’s experience is unique. Readers bring their own ideas, fears, prejudices, and emotions to any book they read and will interpret the story through the filter of their own perception.

No writer can write to meet the expectations and beliefs of every reader. Louis May Alcott in her book Little Women describes the character Jo’s struggle with this very problem…

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Great advice, as usual.

Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors

This post is inspired by Seth Godin’s article “Is everyone entitled to their opinion?”

On the internet, there’s a lot of buzz.  Everyone has an opinion, but are their opinions right for you?  Should you take their advice?

When looking at someone’s advice, take a look at their record.  Can they back up their opinion with results?  Do the authors or marketing “experts” out there telling you how to sell your book have sales to back up their methods?  Check their sales rankings where they sell books.  If someone is telling you marketing techniques that work and if they aren’t selling their own books, then just how well do you think that advice is going to work for you?  Now, if you can find someone who does successfully sell who has the same advice, then it’s worth taking note.  But I suggest following the person who has the sales record…

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